Environment

Climate Change Challenge: All Eyes On The Blue Marble

Aotearoa has committed to net-zero emissions of all greenhouse gases, other than biogenic methane, by 2050. Is that enough? Finlay Macdonald talks to scientists, including those in the Climate Science Initiative

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One of the most widely known photos of Earth, this image was taken by the crew of the final Apollo mission as they made their way to the Moon. It was dubbed the “blue marble”. Photo: NASA

Aotearoa has committed to net-zero emissions of all greenhouse gases, other than biogenic methane, by 2050. Is that enough? Finlay Macdonald talks to scientists, including those in the Climate Science Initiative.

Few countries were ready for the pandemic that’s hit the world. So has the Covid-19 crisis taught us anything about ameliorating the threats of climate change? The world is heading to be 1 degree warmer in 2040, leading to fires, floods, heatwaves and scarcity of water and food. Aotearoa has committed to net-zero emissions of all greenhouse gases, other than biogenic methane, by 2050.But is that enough? FINLAY MACDONALD talks to scientists at the University, including those involved in the new Climate Science Initiative, who are committed to Earth’s survival.

WHEN Professor David Noone explains the hydrologic cycle in lectures, he likes to illustrate it with the famous image of Earth, the “blue marble”, taken from space by the Apollo 17 astronauts in 1972. Yes, there are conventional infographics that explain the way water moves in and out of the atmosphere quite well, but that first space ‘selfie’ really has it all.

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