Army-funded research identified a new chemistry approach that could remove micropollutants from the environment.

size0-full

Micropollutants are biological or chemical contaminants that make their way into ground and surface waters in trace quantities.

Using a pioneering imaging technique, Cornell University researchers obtained a high-resolution snapshot of how ligands, molecules that bind to other molecules or metals, interact with the surface of nanoparticles. In doing so, they made an unexpected breakthrough discovery. They determined that by varying the concentration of an individual ligand they could control the shape of the particle it attached too.

This approach could result in an array of daily applications, including developing chemical sensors that are sensitive at a very low level to a specific chemical in the environment.

Micropollutants are biological or chemical contaminants that make their way into ground and surface waters in trace quantities.

Using a pioneering imaging technique, Cornell University researchers obtained a high-resolution snapshot of how ligands, molecules that bind to other molecules or metals, interact with the surface of nanoparticles. In doing so, they made an unexpected breakthrough discovery. They determined that by varying the concentration of an individual ligand they could control the shape of the particle it attached too.

This approach could result in an array of daily applications, including developing chemical sensors that are sensitive at a very low level to a specific chemical in the environment.

Read more 

Noticias Relacionadas

Icy Waters of ‘Snowball Earth’ May Have Spurred Early Organisms to Grow Bigger

Read News

The Climatic Environment to Sustain Permafrost in Daisetsu Mountains, Hokkaido in Japan, Is Projected to Decrease Significantly in the Future

Read News

UN Climate Panel Contends With Models Showing Implausibly Fast Warming

Read News

Stinkweed Could Make a Cleaner Bio-Jet Fuel, Study Finds

Read News